The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

so def that I can hardly hear any thing that is sed in the house Love and sarvis to all frinds from your loving mother

ABIAH FRANKLIN

ps mother says she ant able & so I must tell you myself that I rejoyce with you & bles god for you in all yr prosperity and doubt not but you will be grater blessings to the world as he bestows upon you grater honers

J M


"Unacquainted with the ways of your place"

[Printed first in Sparks, Familiar Letters, p. 21, from a manuscript now missing; and here reprinted from Sparks. William Franklin, then only twenty but since August 13, 1751, clerk of the Pennsylvania Assembly in succession to his father, had set out by sea during a recess of the Assembly to visit relatives in Boston. Franklin's "new niece" was Abiah Mecom, who was born on August 1 of that year and died April 23, 1752. The "cousin at Casco Bay" was the niece Elizabeth Davenport, married to Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Ingersoll of Falmouth, Maine. By "brother and sister Davenport" Franklin meant James Davenport, whose wife Sarah Franklin had died in May 1731, and his third wife, Mary Walker, whom he had married in November of the same year. "Mrs. Billings" was the mother of Sarah, wife of Josiah Davenport, who was the son of James and Sarah Franklin Davenport.]

Philadelphia, 24 October, 1751

DEAR SISTER,

My son waits upon you with this, whom I heartily recommend to your motherly care and advice. He is indeed a sober and discreet lad of his years, but he is young and unacquainted with the ways of your place.

My compliments to my new niece, Miss Abiah, and pray her to accept the enclosed piece of gold, to cut her teeth; it may afterwards buy nuts for them to crack.

Some time since I sent a letter to your care for our cousin at Casco Bay. Have you had an opportunity to forward it?

My love to brother Mecom and your children; and to brother and sister Davenport and children; and respects to Mrs. Billings and her daughter, and all other friends, from, dear sister,

Your affectionate brother,

B. FRANKLIN

-46-

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