The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Boston Janr 29 1758

DEAR SISTER

for so I must call you come what will & If I dont Express my self proper you must Excuse it seeing I have not been acostomed to Pay my Complements to Governer & Baronets Ladys I am in the midst of a grate wash & Sarah still sick, & would gladly been Excused writing this Post but my husband says I must write & Give you Joy which we [sin] searly Joyn in; I sopose it will [not be?] news to you, but I will tell you how I [came] by it, Mr Fluker Tould Cousen willams & he Docter Perkins who Brought it to my Poor Son nedey who has a nother relaps into Raising Blood & has not Done won stroke of work this month but was Just a going to begin when he was again taken Ill pray Pardon my Bad writing & confused composure & acept it as coming from your Ladyships affectionat Sister & most obedient

Humble Servant

JANE MECOM


"An acrostick on her name"

[Printed first, from a manuscript now missing, in Duane, Works, VI, 39-42, from which it is here reprinted. Sparks, Works, VII, 182-185, omitted the passage between "filthy rags" and "So much by way of commentary" without indicating the omission. The letter "containing an account" of the travels of Franklin and his son William in the summer of 1758 was to Deborah Franklin from London, September 6 of that year.]

London, September 16, 1758

DEAR SISTER,

I received your favour of June 17. I wonder you have had no letter from me since my being in England, I have wrote you at least two, and I think a third before this, and what was next to waiting on you in person, sent you my picture. In June last I sent Benny a trunk of books, and wrote to him; I hope they are come to hand, and that he meets with encouragement in his business. I congratulate you on the conquest of Cape Breton, and hope as your people took it by praying, the first time, you

-65-

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