The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

the Rent was regularly paid to Mrs. Mecom." The balance thus provided by Williams up to September 1768 amounted to £18.8.5, but it does not appear what the normal rent was, or whether there was difficulty with other tenants. Fifteen pounds a year, a probable rent, would then have paid for boarding Peter with a woman in the country.]

Philada NOV. 7. 1763

DEAR SISTER

We stopt one Day at Mrs Green's, and got to Newport the Saturday Evening after we left you, staid there till Tuesday Afternoon, got to Dr Babcock's on Wednesday, staid there till Friday, then went to New London, where we staid among our Friends till Tuesday, then set out for Newhaven, where we arriv'd on Thursday Morning, set out from thence on Friday Afternoon & got to New York on Monday following, and after staying one Day there, one at Woodbridge with Mr Parker, & one at Burlington with Billy who met us 20 Miles on the Road, we got safe home on Saturday Night the 5th Instant, having had a most pleasant Journey without the least ill Accident, and found all well: Thanks to God.

Sally joins in Love to all Friends, and will write if she is not too much interrupted by visiting Friends. I am

Your affectionate Brother

B FRANKLIN


"Very happy in being at home"

[An excerpt from this letter was printed in Sparks, Familiar Letters, p. 88n, as "to another friend." The whole was printed first in Goodman, A Benjamin Franklin Reader, pp. 754-755. It is here more correctly printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. At Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Franklin had fallen from his horse and dislocated a shoulder which was slow in healing. Sarah Bowles, who lodged with Jane Mecom, was a stepdaughter of Sarah Franklin Davenport, whose husband had first married Grace Tileston of Dorchester. Sarah, daughter of James and Grace Davenport, was the widow of Samuel Bowls (or Bowles) of Dorchester, an apothecary, and in 1763 was forty-four. Boston Registry Records, XXVIII (Marriages 1700- 1751), 94, 141; New England Historical and Genealogical Register, XXXIII, 31-32.]

-79-

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