The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Philada Dec. 15. 1763

DEAR SISTER

I thank you for your kind Congratulations on my safe Return. Brother Peter is with me, & very well, except being touch'd a little in his Head with something of the Doctor, of which I hope to cure him.-- For my own Part, I find my self at present quite clear of Pain, & so have at length left off the cold Bath; there is however still some Weakness in my Shoulder, though much stronger than when I left Boston, & Mending. I am otherwise very happy in being at home, where I am allow'd to know when I have eat enough & drank enough, am warm enough, and sit in a Place that I like, &c. and no body pretends to know what I feel better than I do my self. Don't imagine that I am a whit the less sensible of the Kindness I experienc'd among my Friends in New England, I am very thankful for it, & shall always retain a grateful Remembrance of it. Remember me affectionately to all that enquire after

Dear Sister,

Your loving Brother

B FRANKLIN

My Compliments to good

Mrs Bowles.--Sally

writes.


"The Death of your Daughter"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the Yale University Library. Sarah Mecom Flagg had died on June 12 of that year. Peter Franklin had gone from Newport to be postmaster in Philadelphia.]

Philada July 10. 1764.

DEAR SISTER

We all condole with you most sincerely on the Death of your Daughter. She always appear'd to me of a sweet and amiable Temper, and to have many other good Qualities that must make the Loss of her more grievous for Brother & you to bear. Our only Comfort under such Afflictions is, that God knows what is best for us, and can bring Good out of what appears Evil. She is doubtless happy:--which none of us are while in this Life.

-80-

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