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The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Aprove His Prosecuting the busness he is gone to England upon, & that some had used Him with scurillous Language in some Printed Papers [but] I was in Hopes it had so far subsided as not [to] give you any Disturbance, when I [think what you] must Have suffered at the time [how I] pity you; but I think yr Indignation must [have] Exeded yr fear, what a wretched world would [this] be if the vile of mankind had no Laws to [re]strain them!

my famely all thank you for yr kind remembrance of them the children Desier the[ir] Duty, & Mrs Bowls her compliments, Cousen Griffeth can asign no cause for the Death of her child Exept it was fright She Recved won Evening her Husband being absent when some men in Liquer next Dore got to fighting & there was screeming murther. Cousen Holmes are all well billeys wife has calld in to see me with Her son which is a fine won, Cousen willames Looks soon to Lyin she is so big [I tell] Her she will Have two, Poor Sarah has been beter so as to wash the Dishes but she is now wors again her age as you say is not a time to Expect a cure for old Disorders & the Docr says there is no Hopes for her but she will Dwindle away, she is a Good Creture & Paitent It would Greve you to hear what a Cough she has that Repels all medicens but she is Hardly Ever Heard to complain.

Remember my Love to Cousen sally & Primit me again to thank you for [yr] Pres[ent and] subscribe my self yr affectionat & obliged

Sister

JANE MECOM

1766

Boston feb 27


"Hosanna to day, and tomorrow, Crucify him"

[An excerpt from this letter was printed in Sparks, Familiar Letters, pp. 98-99n. It is here first printed in full from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The "Cards" Franklin mentioned in his postscript bore copies of his famous symbolical plate called "Magna

-90-

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