The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

"Mezzotinto Print" which Franklin sent was the engraving by Edward Fisher from the portrait of Franklin painted by Mason Chamberlin in 1762.]

DEAR SISTER, London, Sept. 20. 1768

The last Letter I have received from you is dated May 11. I hope you continue well, tho' 'tis so long since I have heard from you. As your good Friend Capt. Freeman has not been here this Summer, I am afraid his Sickness that you mention proved fatal to him, which I shall be sorry to hear, as I had conceiv'd a great Esteem for him. I suppose the Dissolution of your Assembly will affect you a little in the Article of Boarders; but do not be discouraged. Your Debt to Mrs Stevenson is paid, and she presents her kind Respects to you, and desires you will freely command her Service at any time. I cannot always conveniently send you the Pieces I write in the Papers here, for several Reasons; but will do it when I can.--I send the Mezzotinto Print herewith. My Love to Cousin Jenny & all enquiring Friends, from

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN


"A Sketch of the Table and Company"

[Printed first, from a manuscript in the American Philosophical Society, in Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiographical Writings, pp. 181-183. Franklin dined on October 1, 1768, with King Christian VII of Denmark, then visiting in London. The following week Franklin wrote an account of the dinner in a letter to his son which is now missing. A part of the letter, copied in another hand, was sent to Jane Mecom, with a "Sketch of the Table and Company" which is herewith reproduced. The names, from the King counter-clockwise round the table, are Admiral ( George Brydges) Rodney, Dr. Matthew Matty (actually Maty), Baron Bulow, Baron Schimmelman, Count Behrnstorff, Gen [eral] Edward Harvey (not Hervey), Count Holeke, Count Moleke, Baron Diede, Secretary Schumacker, M. de Passon, Mr. (John) Duning (actually Dunning), Count Ahlefeldtz, Officer on Gu[ar]d, B. Franklin, Lord Moreton ( James Douglas, 14th Earl of Morton).]

-104-

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