The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

London, Nov. 7. 1770

DEAR SISTER,

I received your kind Letter of July 6. and was glad to hear (since you chose to return) that you were got so well home. I hope the Hurt you receiv'd will be attended with no bad Consequences. My Arm, that had given me no Uneasiness for several Years, had lately begun again to pain me, from a slight Strain, and I am now afraid will continue to do so as long as I live, since it has not mended for some Months past. But as I grow old, being now near 65, it is a Comfort that nothing can pain me long. You had not, I hope, any Offence in Philadelphia, that inducd you to leave it so soon. I must stay here this Winter, but hope to be in that dear Place pretty early in the next Summer, being quite uneasy under so long a Banishment from my Country & my Family. I have been for a great part of my Day engag'd abroad in the Bustle of Publick Business: It is time now that I should return home, spend the Evening with my Friends, and be ready to go chearfully to Bed. My Respects to Dr. Cooper, Love to Cousin Jenny, & believe me ever

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN

I condole with you on the loss of my dear old Friend Mr. Whitefield which I have just heard of.

Nov. 9--70

Since writing the above I have received yours of Sept. 29. by our Kinsmen, who are safe arrived, & lodge with Mrs. Stevenson. We shall endeavour to make their Residence here as agreable to them as possible. Be in no Concern about any Abuses I receive here in the Newspapers. 'Tis the Fashion to roast one another, and I sometimes take a little of that Diversion myself. I enclose you a Newspaper or two which you may show to Dr. Cooper, but if you think you see any thing of mine there, don't let it be publish'd as such; for I am obnoxious enough here already on Acct. of some Letter I wrote to Philada. I will en

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