The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

thing there wonc a year & stay a fortnight I fancy so short a Time would Affect my my Helth with change of Climate, I Percive Deby Davenport has got a Litle of her mothers Flatring Disposition but obligeing Actions are more substantial than words tho they are not Disagreable if they come from the Hart,

I wish Mrs Kepley very happy in her New Habitation Present my Respectfull complements to Her & Every won that Inquier After me, Cousin Bache knows she is a Leter in my Dept & I will not Excuse her Exept she is in sircumstances & very sick, so you must tell me that & Every other thing that you know I shall Like to hear, if you send it to my son He will find a vesel to send it by & Pleas to tell them [interlined: my son & his wife] that I shall Expect a Long Leter from Each of them for I have heard nothing of them this whol winter I beleve by this time you are hartyly tiered with this trumprey that in compashon to you I conclud

yr affectionat Sister
JANE MECOM

Dear Sister if Catey should send a Leter to you for me Do be so Good as git it sent to me by water


"That Christian virtue of resignation"

[Printed first in Sparks, Works, VII, 495-498, from which it is here reprinted. Smyth, Writings, V, 288-292, credits his text to a manuscript in the British Museum, but the Keeper of Manuscripts of the Museum reported on December 30, 1948, that no such manuscript could be found; and the Smyth text varies from that of Sparks only in the substitution of capital letters and the occasional use of "'d" for "ed" through the first three paragraphs and a part of the fourth. The two books for which Jane Mecom had asked in her letter of September 22 (not 25 as Franklin mistakenly says), and which he now sent her have not been identified. The printer's widow whom Franklin had known during his first visit to England, 1724-1726, was Elizabeth Ilive, who died in 1733. Her son was Jacob Ilive. His "solemn discourse," or Oration, was delivered, according to the article on him in the Dictionary of National Biography, at Brewers' Hall and at Joyners' Hall on September 10 and September 23 respectively, the year of his mother's death.]

-121-

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