The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

What is this Relation called? Is it third Cousins?

Having mentioned so many Dyers in our Family, I will now it's in my Mind request of you a full & particular Receipt for Dying Worsted of that beautiful Red, which you learnt of our Mother.--And also a Receipt for making Crown Soap. Let it be very exact in the smallest Particulars. Enclos'd I send you a Receipt for making soft Soap in the Sun.

I have never seen any young Men from America that acquir'd by their Behaviour here more general Esteem than those you recommended to me. Josiah has stuck close to his musical Studies, and still continues them. Jonathan has been diligent in Business for his Friends as well as himself, obliging to every body, tender of his Brother, not fond of the expensive Amusements of the Place, regular in his Hours, and spending what Leisure Hours he had in the Study of Mathematics. He goes home to settle in Business, and I think there is great Probability of his doing well.

With best Wishes for you & all yours, I am ever,

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN

I have mislaid the Soap Receipt but will send it when I find it.


Jane Mecom to Deborah Franklin

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. John Foxcroft, with his wife, was then in Boston on affairs of the post office. Jonathan Williams, in an unpublished letter dated August 5 of that year and in the American Philosophical Society, told Franklin: "Aunt Mecom Dined with us a few Days ago with a large Compa Mr Foxcroft & his Lady &c." Jane Mecom's spelling "Grand Papah" indicates that the Baches used the French pronunciation of "Papa," though the Boston Franklins did not--and probably pronounced it "Pappy."]

Boston Sep 2d 1771

DEAR SISTER

I wrot you wonce sine Mr Foxcroft came as He tould me they should go in His Paquet free of Postage, but I will never

-128-

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