The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

May 1772?

MY DEAR SISTER

I did reseve yours by Capt Roger with a bundel for Mr. Macum which I reseved and sente with your letter to him and by Mr Prockter with one in Closed for Mrs Macum which I all so sente to him senes that Cusin Betsey come with the Child and dined with us as shee dus some times I advised that they shold write to you

you will see that Mr Bache is safe arived thank god he has opned store he is well as is Salley and our Kingbird. I supose Mr Bache or Salley will write to you as I am not a bel to write nor am I abel to write agreeabel letters as ones I yous to doe for I have not so good matter to worke on as I yous to write on or to make letters on but I will say all the good I can my one famely is well as to the reste I hear not quite so well but I expeckte the Governer and his ladey to town aboute two or three week and then I beleve thay will write to you

give my love to all that Loves me tell me hough Brother Davenportes children is tell me aney thing of poor Polley that did live hear I seme much Consernd for her let me know hough bis Peter I have not heard a boute him a long while I ofen think of him now I have indevered to make as good a letter as I cold I donte let aney bodey see my letter as I write so bad my love to Jenney and the other Jenney [interlined: flag] and to Cusin Kisiah and her Dafter Mrs Replay is very well and her son who is well Mrs Defeld and famely and maney of your friend they ofen aske a boute you and send love to you

My Dear Sister I wrote I had but one only other thing I wold writ if I had but one thing I wold write to you but I have not anything that wold give you aney pleshuer


"The greater Pleasure of seeing you"

[Printed first in the Century Magazine, XXXII ( June 1886), 263-264, by John Bigelow, and included in Bigelow, Works, V, 110-111, from the manuscript in the Library of Congress; printed in Smyth, Writings, VI, 21, with unwarranted dependence on the Bigelow text; here printed more correctly from the manuscript. Captain Jenkins was one of the

-137-

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