The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Commendation. You write better, in my Opinion, than most American Women. Here indeed the Ladies write generally with more Elegance than the Gentlemen.

By Capt. Hatch went a Trunk containing the Goods you wrote for. I hope they will come safe to hand and please. Mrs Stevenson undertook the Purchasing them with great Readiness and Pleasure. Teasdale, whom you mention as selling cheap, is broke & gone. Perhaps he sold too cheap. But she did her best.

I congratulate you on the marriage of your Daughter. My Love to them. I am oblig'd to good Dr Cooper for his Prayers.

Your Shortness of Breath might perhaps be reliev'd by eating Honey with your Bread instead of Butter, at Breakfast.

Young Hubbard seems a sensible Boy, & fit, I should think for a better Business than the Sea. I am concern'd to hear of the Illness of his good Mother.

If Brother John had paid that Bond, there was no Occasion to recal it for you to pay it; for I suppose he might have had Effects of our Fathers to pay it with. I never heard how it was managed.

Mrs Stevenson presents her Respects, and I am ever
Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN


Jane Collas to Benjamin Franklin

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Franklin, hearing that his sister's daughter Jane was to be married, had requested Jonathan Williams Sr. on November 3, 1772, to "lay out the sum of fifty pounds, lawful money, in bedding or such other furniture as my sister shall think proper to be given the new-married couple towards housekeeping, with my best wishes; and charge that sum to my account." The records of the Brattle Street Church show that Samuel Cooper married Peter "Collis" (Collas) and Jane Mecom on March 23, 1773.]

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