The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

five oclock & there is an Expres come brings News they have shatered them boath much & Drove the Roebuck on shore the same that was Ashore on Sunday week but go off again it is Expected she will be Taken, Ray desiers me to Remember His Duty love & Respects where it is Due & Pleas to do the same for your Affectionat friend

JANE MECOM


"The Respect with which I am receiv'd and treated"

[Reproduced in facsimile in the Library Bulletin 1944 of the American Philosophical Society, from the manuscript in the Society; and first printed in Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiographical Writings, 424-425.]

Nantes, in France, Dec. 8. 1776.

DEAR SISTER

I arrived here safe after a Passage of 30 Days, somewhat fatigued and weakned by the Voyage, which was a rough one; but I recover my Strength fast since my Landing, and shall be able I hope in a few days to undertake the Journey to Paris of about 250 Miles. If the PostChaises here were as easy as the English, such a Journey would be no Difficulty.--I hope you continue well and happy. Remember me affectionately to Cousin Jenney, & to Mr & Mrs Greene. I am ever

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN

You can have no Conception of the
Respect with which I am receiv'd and
treated here by the first People, in my
private Character: for as yet I have
assumed no public One--


"We thought it necessary to Retire to this place"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. At the approach of the British Army, before the Battle of Trenton, Jane Mecom left Philadelphia with Sarah Bache and her children for refuge at Goshen, twenty-four miles from the city. They had, ac

-168-

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