The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Boston

January 9th 1778

MY DEAR AND EVER HONORD UNCLE

Forgive me for dareing to incroch on one of you precious moments by obliging you to read a trifeling litter from me, but as a number of letters will by Gods permition be handed to you by the Same person who brings this I cant help letting you know that this person is my Husband, whom I tenderly love and in whome all my hopes of happiness in this life are Senterd, permit me to recommend him to your notice as prudent and industerous, and one whos Heart never knew Deceit, he has been unfortunat Extreemly so, not through any Misconduct all who knows him will own, and I can give no other reason but his being collected with one of the most unhappy familyes that I ever knew.

Will you Sir add one more obligation to the enumerable, by giveing him your advice and any assistance he may need in his beausiness if he should be so happy as to see you. I feel guilty while I am asking the favor, tho thousands perhaps who are all most strangers to you ar reaping those bennifits unasked from your benevolent disposition,

I have had the pleasure of seeing my dear Mamma since her return to Coventry, I hope if my dear Collas returns safe I shall be enable'd to keep house, and be bless'd in her company, at present I am obliged to leave all my friends and retier to country lodgings to save expences, a person must have a good income to be able to live in Town every thing is so very dear but I am lengthing out my Epissel and hindering you to no purpos I will again beg pardon for this intrusion and hasten to subcribe myself with the greatest respect your very affectionate and ever

duityfull Neice JANE COLLAS


Jane Mecom to Jane Collas

[Here first printed from a copy in N.E. Historic Genealogical Society. The note at the end is in the copyist's hand, and there in square brackets. Jane Collas had visited her mother at the Potowomut house of Jane

-173-

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