The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

"Much troble & many mercys"

[Here first printed in full from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Wanton Casey, who carried this letter, was the son of William Greene's neighbor, Silas Casey, mentioned though not named in Jane Mecom's letter of June 23, 1779. The notation "Answd April 22" is in Franklin's hand.]

Answd April 22

Warwick 4 Jany 1779

MY DEAR BROTHER

I wrot you about a month past but haveing an opertunity by a young Gentilman of this Nabour hood who is going directly to France & desiers to be Introduced so far to yr Notice if he goes to Paris, as to Advice him to a good scool where he may Larn the Language & perfect himself in merchants acoumpts, I would not miss it hopeing some of the many leters I write may reach yr hand I believe I have hither to been very unsuccesfull boath ways as I cant perswade my self but you have writen divers to me since Mr Simeion Dean came which was the last I recved, & I have heard of several of mine to you has fell in to the hands of the Enemie when shall we be at peace that we may at least have the comfort of Each others leters which to me is grat. I do not pretend to say any thing about publick Affairs & as to my self I have mett with much troble & many mercys, I Injoy much helth & the Same Friendly Entertainment from the Governer & wife while I am hear, & the same at my Grand childs which are blesings, there famelies are boath well & our friend Caty desiers to be remembred to you, her Husband is not at home. I write among so much noise & confusion that if I had any thing of consequence I could not Recolect it & will not atemt any more but that

I am as Ever yr affectionat sister

JANE MECOM

My love to Temple & Benny I expect Mr Wanton Casey who is to be the barer of this to send for it as he is to sett of for Boston in the morning therefore have no other time to write Jane Mecom to Sarah Bache

-186-

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