The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

febr 27

Since I wrot the above I have recd a leter from my son collas from Nants says he has seen you that you are well I have also recdd won from his wife who has been sick but now prety well has recved some things her husband sent her

JM


"Too much Business upon my Hands"

[First printed in Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiographical Writings, pp. 467-468, and now printed again from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society.]

Passy April 22. 1779.

DEAR SISTIER,

I received your kind Letter of Jan. 4 which gave me the Satisfaction of knowing that you were well, and comfortably situated among your Friends. You mention other Letters you have written, but they are not come to hand. Don't however be discouraged from writing as often as you can; for I am uneasy when long without hearing from you; and the Chance is greater that one Letter out of many should arrive, than one out of a few. I have written to Mr Williams to assist you from time to time, as you may have occasion: and I confide in his readiness to do every thing necessary for you, as I know he Esteems you, and I have always reimbursed him. If you do not hear from me so often as formerly, impute it to the too much Business upon my Hands and the Miscarriage of Letters, or any thing rather than a diminution of Affection. I have seen nothing of Mr Casey, whom you mention as the Bearer of your Letter. I suppose he did not come to Paris.

As to myself, I continue to enjoy, Thanks to God, a greater Share of Health and Strength than falls to the Lot of many at my Age. I have indeed sometimes moderate Fits of the Gout; but I think it is not settled among the Physicians whether that is a Disease or a Remedy. I live about two Miles out of the City, in a great Garden, that has pleasant Walks in which I can take Exercise in a good Air, the Situation being high and dry. The Village has many good Houses & good Families, with whom I

-190-

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