The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

leter & are much disapointed that they contain no Politicks, I tell them you Dare not trust a woman Politicks, & prehaps that is the truth but if there is any thing we could not posable misconstru or do mischief by knowing from you, it will Gratifie us mightly if you add a litle to yr future kind leters.

Mr Collas met a man in the street & sent my leter I have had no line from or His wife so do not know his Inclineation concerning the crown soap but shall as soon as posable make some to send to you but fear whether that can be till the new wax comes in for I have tryd Shops & aquaintance hear & can not procure any, the country people put it in to there sumer candles, I have desiered cousen Williams to try to pick up a litle in the Shops there, & shall try at provedence, I am sorry to be deprived of the pleasure of gratifieing you, but my power was allways small tho my will is good. yr Friends Greene are well & He gives Satisfaction in His Office, they have boath writen to you since the date of yrs to me. they are happy to hear of your helth & suckses, my Grandson & Daughter send there Duty to you--they are a happy cople have won child calld Sally, he is a sensable & very Industrous man & she a very good wife, boath treet me very kindly, & I beleve I am as happy as it is common for a human being, what is otherways may proceed from my own Impatience

that God may Grant what you hope for in the conclution of yr leter is the prayer

of yr affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM


"No won Els can make the trew soap"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 102-104; here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. A corner of the manuscript is now torn off, and the words in square brackets are supplied from Duane, who may have had the letter entire in 1859 or may have only conjectured the missing words. "Sall Hatch Corl Hatch's Sister who went of with the Britons" was Sarah Hatch, sister of Colonel Estes Hatch of Dorchester. He was dead and could not support her, and she had apparently left Boston for Halifax with

-195-

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