The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

you wishd to have it for. be it as it will let me know. Remember my Love to Temple & to Benny when you write to him

I am Ever yr very affectionate
and obliged Sister
JANE MECOM


Jane Mecom to Sarah Bache

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the Princeton University Library. The letter is undated, but it evidently was written after Jane Mecom received Sarah Bache's letter of August 18, and before she herself wrote to Franklin on December 29, 1780. Louis Bache had been born in October 1779. The ladies of Philadelphia had raised money for the soldiers of the Continental Army in the summer of 1780. Sarah Bache and four others had supervised the collection in the district between Market and Chestnut Streets. Sarah Bache had contributed 300 Continental dollars, then much depreciated, and another 100 in the name of "Miss Bache," that is, Elizabeth, aged three. The subscription lists are printed in W. B. Reed, The Life and Correspondence of Joseph Reed ( 1847), II, 428-449. The "Infamous Fellow" who had traduced Franklin was Ralph Izard, who returned with "Lea," Arthur Lee, in the summer of 1780 to continue in America their campaign of animosity against their former colleague in Paris. The great-grandchildren Jane spoke of were the daughter and son of her granddaughter Jane Greene, with whom she was then living in Rhode Island. "Daughter Mecom" was Benjamin Mecom's widow, then in Philadelphia, and "Jenny" was her daughter, Jane Mecom, a child being cared for in or near Boston. The somewhat involved passage at the end of the third paragraph means, put simply, that Governor William Greene had been obliged to accept depreciated paper money in payment for debts owed him, but had had to pay a Newport creditor in silver for a debt contracted in paper. There is an incomplete copy of this letter in the Yale University Library.]

[ October 1780]

DEAR NEICE

Your favour of August i 8th gave me much Pleasure to hear you & your Famely were well & that such a friendly Intercours is keept up betwen you & that very worthy Famely Mr Deffealds, & I should have been Proud to have seen the Gentielman you would have Introduced to me & have shewn Him all the civillities in my Power, but the Leters were brought to me by

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