The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

along as they have no Children, but He is so unlucky he never sails but I Expect to hear he is taken or cast away,

I wrote to you when I was at Boston but have heard of no opertunity since till the ship was Gone, this Goes from Provedenc in a vesel owened by Quakers so I sopose no Guns to Defend them, I hope houever it may git sail to you, & that I shall be fortunit anouf to recve some from you, which is all ways a grate pleasure to your affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

My love to Temple & to Benny when you write to him, do write me somthing about them or Preswade Temple to Spend a Hower in gratifieing his old Aunt


"That we might End our Days to gather"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society.]

Warwick March 3 1781

DEAR BROTHER

you will forgive the Incorectnes of my Leter when I tell you I most comonly write on very short Notice of an opertunity as it happens now, General Greene's Wife being hear offers to send it by a saif conveyance, & I gladly Embrace it, as I am Aprehencive but few of those I writ git saif to your hand; the last I wrot went from Provedence in a New Vesel owned by Friends there, charls Jenkens master, without Guns; & we had a rumer she was taken soon after she sailed but as it was some time ago & there has been no confermation we have some hopes of her Escape. I wrot a Sheet full on Every thing concerning my self that I thought you would wish to know but have no coppy & can now Recolect but litle of it & Shall not have time to Repeet that Litle. I am grown Impatient to hear from you as it is now within two Days of a year since the Last Line I have recved from you was Dated.

I am still in tolarable Helth & Ever way as comfortable

-207-

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