The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Lost it which I do not so much wonder at in the bustle of marrieing won of the young Ladys for such a circumstance Jeneraly taks the atention of all the famely. but I am sorry, for I sent to desier them to try Dr Cooper, Mr Lathorp & Mr Stillman & if I was there I Dont Doubt I could find it by what I remember of it, but not corect anouf to write. I have heard nothing of my Neace or her famely at Philadelphia a long time, & know but litle how the world goes Except seeing a Newspaper some times which contains Enough to give Pain but litle Satisfaction while we are in Armes aganst Each other

Parson Odell has been Exersiseing His Poetical Talant on yr Invention of the Chamber Fireplace it came to me throw the hands of Crasey Harry Badcock & I have half a mind to send it to you as I think it would make you Laugh but if you should be coming home it will serve to Divert you hear, I contineu very Easey and happy hear have no more to trroble me than what is Incident to human Nature & cant be avoided in any Place, I write now in my own litle chamber the window opening on won of the Pleasantest prospects in the country the Birds singing about me & nobod up in the house near me to Desturb me

you will Readiely condud from these circumstances I might have Performd beter, but I have lost my faculty if Ever I had any and my Dear Brother will except Sencerity in lieu of it from his Ever affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

My Grandson & Daughter have desiered me to present there Duty, I want very much to hear all about Temple & benny Pray present my love to them


"A coletcion of all your works"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 115-116, and here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The "coletcion of all your works" which Jane Mecom had in mind was the Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces edited by Benjamin Vaughan in 1779. John Thayer, taking this letter to Franklin, had another from Jane Collas, dated Cambridge, June 6, introducing Thayer: her letter is in the American Philosophical

-210-

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