The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

"All the season Blooming"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The Prince to whom Jane Mecom referred was the first son of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, Louis Joseph Xavier François, born October 1781, died June 1789. Franklin's "Granson" Benjamin Franklin Bache had won prizes at his school in Geneva. "Sturdy Bill" was William Bache, formerly called the Infant Hercules, in Philadelphia. The dead brother of Jonathan Williams Sr. has not been identified, but he was not John, who appears elsewhere in the notes to this volume. Elizabeth Williams had been married to Joshua Eaton on April 24, 1781. Boston Registry Records, xxx (Marriages 1752-1809), 448.]

Warwick 25 June 1782

DEAR BROTHER

I wrot you a few Days ago, & at Governer Greenes Request Inclosed a memerandom concerning a Prisoner I also Informed you of the Irreparable Lose I have mett with in the Death of my Dear Grand Daughter Greene with whome I had Lived in as Perfect composeure & Tranquility as Human-Nature will admit of, She was affectionate & Respectfull to me, an affectionate & Prudent wife, & an Indulgent mother, I am still at her Dieing Request that I would not Leve her children as long as I live & the Request also of her bereved Husband with Them in the Famely, He is kind & affectionat to me but something constantly Passes that keeps alive my sorrow tho I have Plenty of all Nesesarys & the same Beautiful Prospect arownd me & all the season Blooming I so much mis her sosiety that it spreads a gloom over all.

Cousen Williams has made me a visit He came Partly on Busness as far as Provedence & Partly to Recrute His Spirits affter the long Sickness & Death of His Brother who Died much about the same time my Child did, He has lost three grandchildren by His son John, has won by His Daughter Bettsey (who married a Mr Eaton) He seems much Pleasd with, as we all are with our litle wons, they are Realy Pleasant diverting things I seem as if I could not soport Life without mine tho they cause many sorrowfull Reflections, there Father desiers His Duty to you.

-215-

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