The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Remember me Affectionatly to
Temple I hope he is as good
to you as Ever, & to Benny
Bache if with you.
Our Friend madam Greene
all way Inquiers after you
and desiers to be Remembred


"I know you give it with Pleasure"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in the Pennsylvania Magazine of His-
tory and Biography, xxxvi
( 1912), 119-120, from the manuscript in
the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; and here printed again from the
manuscript. It appears that Samuel Bradford, son-in-law of Jonathan
Williams Sr., was using the money Jane Mecom had received for the
goods from London, and was paying her interest. Thomas Hubbart,
whose first wife Judith Ray had died in 1775, was married to Anna
Bigelow of Weston, Massachusetts, on August 5, 1784. Boston Reg-
istry Records, xxx
(Marriages 1752- 1809), 322. Captain Samuel
Partridge had been one of the Overseers of the Poor in Boston in Janu-
ary 1779. Winsor, Memorial History of Boston, iv, 651.]

Boston May 26-1785

DEAR BROTHER

I recved you kind Leter Dated Octr 16 about a fourtnight ago, by way of Philadelphia, with grat Pleasure as it gave me to understand your Malady does not Increace upon you, but you always Represent your Afflictions as Light as Posable to your Sister because you know she constantly Greves for you, but I think I can Discover you to be in Pain even while you thus write. your Tendernes for me In that Respect as in all other Vertues far Exedes mine, for to my Regret I Reflect that my Last Leter to you contained two many complaints of my Ill State of Health and Natureal Decays, which I sopose you had not Recved, but God has been beter to me than my fears for tho it has Indeed been a Severe Winter I have had Less Indisposition than in Ither of the two Preceding Winters I am however Dayly Looking forward to that State wich you wonce gave me a hint was more Proper for my contemplation than seeking a

-233-

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