The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

widdow in the country who he was a long time strugling to obtain & has conquered at Last I have not heard from our friends at Road Island a long time I have thoughts of Taking a Journy thare our friend Caty Greene Desiers me allways to Remember her to you when I write.

my son Collas is now gone to the Eastward to bring a New vesel He is going to the west Indies in She is a Poor weakly wooman hardly Ever well

Jenny Mecom is still with us strong & harty so there is won in the Famely free from complaints.

we have had grat Bustling hear about the choice of Govener and I hear are Like to have none this year, but I dont Doubt you will see all the Papers so shall only add that with the most sincear Gratitute & Prayers for your Ease an comfort

I remain your Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

my Daughter & Grandaughter
Desier there Duty, my Love to Temple
& Benny if with you


"Go home, and go to Bed"

[The first paragraph of this letter was printed in Sparks, Works, x, 213, as "to a sister in America." The whole letter was printed first in Smyth, Writings, IX, 363-364, with slight inaccuracies. It is here printed from the letter sent, now in the Henry E. Huntington Library. There is a copy in another hand, and apparently of a later date, in the American Philosophical Society. Thomas Truxtun, as he spelled his name, had been an active privateersman during the Revolution, and was later captain and commodore in the United States Navy. The ship in which he brought Franklin home was the Philadelphia-built London Packet, 300 tons, then on her maiden voyage which had included Charleston, South Carolina, and London before she arrived at Cowes. She carried a miscellaneous cargo, but according to her owners had "elegant and convenient accommodations for passengers." The best account of the homeward voyage is Charles F. Jenkins, "Franklin Returns from France-- 1785," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 92, 417-432.]

-235-

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