The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

"After a pleasant Passage"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical
Society. Franklin had landed in Philadelphia on September 14. In the
tumult of his reception the earliest letters he found time to write were
this to his sister and one to John Jay, secretary of foreign affairs for
the Continental Congress, to whom it was Franklin's duty to report.
On the twentieth he wrote to the William Greenes and to George
Washington. The "5 Weeks & 6 Days from Land to Land" is either
a slip or else must mean from the last sighting of land in the Channel
to the first in America. The London Packet sailed from Cowes on July
28, and Franklin and his party did not leave it for six weeks and six
days.]

Philada Sept. 19. 1785.

DEAR SISTER

I arrived here last Wednesday with my two Grandsons & Cousin Jonathan Williams all well, Thanks to God, after a pleasant Passage of 5 Weeks & 6 Days from Land to Land. I wrote a few Lines to you just before my Departure from France. I am continually surrounded by congratulating Friends, which prevents my adding more than that I am ever

Your affectionate Brother

B. FRANKLIN

Mrs. Mecom
My Love to your Children, and
Love to Cousin Williams and Family
in all which my Grandsons join.


"Saif to his Desiered Porte"

[Printed in part in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 132-133, and here first printed in full from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Franklin in a letter of April 13-14 to Jonathan Williams Sr. had sent his sister a draft on William Vernon of Newport, to whose son William Henry Vernon in Paris Franklin had lent money. See Franklin's letter to William Vernon, October 14, 1785, first printed in Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiographical Writings, pp. 658-662.]

-237-

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