The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

men I send; and not that which is white & curdled and crumbly.

I do not complain of any suppos'd Ingratitude in Vernon; I can excuse his being out of humour with his Son's Drawing on him, who stays in Paris spending his Time & Substance unprofitably, contrary to his Father's Will. I wish you had mention'd the exact Sum he paid, that I might have judg'd whether he was right or wrong in paying five Dollars short of what you demanded. I take him to be a very honest good Man, and believe he will still do what is right if I can show him that he was wrong. Cousin Jonathan will calculate it for us.

You shall have a Copy of the Catalogue of Books as soon as I can find it; but you will see it sooner in the Hands of Cousin Williams, to whom the Books were consigned. Those you recommended of Dr Stennet are among them.

I am glad to hear that your Daughter's Health is better. My Love to her and your Grand daughter, in which this Family joins with

Your affectionate Brother

B FRANKLIN

When you have a little Leisure write me an Account of all the Relations we have left in New England Oct. 29. I inclose the Catalogue


"I never had a Tast for High Life"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 137-138, with about half the text omitted; here first printed in full from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The reference to "Popes mind" is to Pope An Essay on Man, IV, 80. Samuel Bradford had married a daughter of Jonathan Williams Sr. The bearer of this letter to Philadelphia, and of other letters, was "Mr Wouters," not otherwise identified. The sickness of Jonathan Williams Sr. was described by his son Jonathan Jr. in a letter to Franklin of September 6, 1789, as the result largely of the elder Williams' addiction to a mystical philosophy which he had derived from Jakob Boehme in the year 1772. This letter is in the American Philosophical Society. The accounts of Franklin and Williams for 1764 to 1773 show that in

-243-

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