The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

something beter gos abroad a Litle & at times more chearfull but as I have this Day an opertunity to send it by a Gentleman who has conections with Mr Bache going directly there I send it, it may not be Amiss to you. no won Els need see my Leters

I dined with this Gentleman at Mr Bradfords & Ventured to Invite Him to come & Drink Tea with us which he Readily accepted, & very Politely offred to carrie your Leter, we Live all ways Cleen and Look Decent and I wanted he should tell you he saw me at home.

my Daughter has Returnd from the country much mended in her Health her Husband is Expected Every Day from the west indies has a prospect of doing beter than comon if he gits in saif.

She with my Grandaughter Jenny Mecom Remember there Duty to you. Remember Love to all yrs from yr Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM


"It would be cleaver to have thirteen Stars"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 138-140, without the name of "Mr Olever of Chelsey"; here printed entire from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. "Cousen Jonathan," that is, Jonathan Williams Jr., had brought his aunt the catalogue of the books presented to the town of Franklin, and was now learning with her to make crown soap. "Mr Olever" was Nathaniel Oliver. His son Daniel graduated from Dartmouth in 1785, and in 1787 became pastor of the Second Congregational Church of Beverly, Massachusetts. Nathaniel Oliver's son Nathan, under arrest with Samuel Cleansey, James Thompson, and John Atkinson, had been convicted in the County Court of Quarter Sessions, Philadelphia, of "a riot and assault and battery," but their fines had been remitted on November 5, according to Colonial Records of Pennsylvania, XIV, 571. See Franklin's reply to this letter, dated January 1, 1786. Young Nathan Oliver (whose name is given as Nathaniel in Boston Registry Records, XXIV, Births, 1700- 1800, 311) was a half-brother of the Rev. Daniel Oliver, and son of his father's second wife Sarah, daughter of Captain Thomas Hill. The "Grandmother on his mothers side" with whom Jane Mecom had been long acquainted seems to have been Captain Hill's wife Hannah Cushing, married on July 13, 1727, exactly two weeks before Jane Franklin and Edward Mecom were married.]

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