The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

him I spun out three Years under the patronage of St Crispin and I humbly beg you'd omit that in your Letter to him.

Dear Grandma now is the time for me to appear to the best Advantage, and your kind Assistance will Confer a peculiar favour on your ever Dutiful

Grandson

JOSIAH FLAGG

Please to give my Love to Uncle and Aunt Collas and Cousin Jenny


"My Dear good Gentileman"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. A "chease of Thirty wight" was a cheese of thirty pounds weight.]

DEAR BROTHER

Boston Apr 22, 1786

Yours of the 8th Inst found me at the Soap copper Indevouring to gratifie you as I had Promised with some Soap Green as well as good, and have Accordingly added more wax than the Proportion which is a third, I have now Put 12 lb Wax to 20 lb of Tallow the Produce I shall send you by the first Vesel, but I am much mortified at your Disopointment of the other, (I had not the Least Aprehention of such a thing I never saw a Like Instance nor Even knew the Frost to have such Influence on it Exept it was Exposed singly when very Green) it was Exellent Good & the Peeces I reserved fror my self Remane so haveing had them in a warm Dry Room,

Prehaps an Accedent some what similar I have Expearanced this winter may comfort you concerning what you sent away, we Bought a chease of Thirty wight that had stood in the Frost till it was so crumbly we could not cut a bit as big as a dolar that would hold together but keeping it in a warm celar somewhat Damp some time after I could cut a considerable slice, who knows but a warm Damp Vesel may have the same Effect on the Soap; for the Recovery of what you have Left, I at first thought it might Ansure to make a fine clear small ley to De

-262-

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