The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

little to say. I receiv'd your kind letter of July 21. I rejoice with you at the Success of your Bridge. It was I think a noble & hardy Enterprise. This Family joins in Love to you and yours with

Your affectionate Brother

B FRANKLIN

Mrs Mecom

P.S. I send you herewith three Medals, One that I struck to commemorate our two important Victories, and in honour of France for the Assistance she afforded us: The other two struck as Compliments to your Brother, One by the Lodge of the Nine Sisters, of which he was President, the other by a private Friend.


"Usefull to Every Indevidual of mankind"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 148-149; and here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Dr. John Morgan of Philadelphia was then on a visit to Boston and had seen Jane Mecom.]

Boston Sepr 13--1786

DEAR BROTHER

My Grandson Arived hear on Saturday night well & very gratfull for the kindness you shewd him, has brought me yr favours of the 3. medals & chany covers, for which I thank you, your Device in the first is very Striking, the others are very Pretty; multitudes that have a disposition to shew you Respect, has no other means than an Honest Acknolidgement of yr Vertues and Servises, it is your Due, for he who is allways studing to be usefull to Every Indevidual of mankind is Intitled to all the Respect in there Power to shew.

I am glad you are so perfectly Recovered of the Gout. I hope Mr & Mrs Bache's Health is also confermed. Dr morgan tells me the Fevour & Ague is more freequent there than it formerly was. I hope yr whol Famely will have beter health in future. Excuse me to Mrs Bache. I will writ to her next opertunity, Remember me to Temple & all the Rest of the Good creatures,

-281-

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