The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview
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cousen Jonathan too I sopose injoys it, my Love to him & thanks for his kind atention to me & my most Respectfull Complements to Mrs Hewston & tell her I hope She will Like America.

I had Intended to have wrote to my Niece but cannot at this time but Remember my Love to Mr & Mrs Bache & all the Dear Children

from yr Ever obliged & Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM


"Very Bold in writing to you"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 152-154, and here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Jane Mecom's story of the Stickney descendants of Sarah Franklin Davenport came from Mrs. Jonathan Williams Sr. and Mrs. "Rodgers" (Rogers), an aunt of the Anthony Stickney who had written to Franklin. The reference to Franklin's "hansom Present" to the father of his correspondent may have reminded Franklin of a letter he had written to Captain Anthony Stickney of "Newbury Port" twenty-three years before. The letter, copied by Benjamin Franklin Stickney in April 1833 and sent to Jared Sparks, is now in the Harvard University Library.

" PhiladaJune 16 1764

"Loving Kindsman,

I received yours of the 16th May, and am glad to hear that you and your Family are well, and that your wife is safely delivered of another Daughter, which I hope will prove a Blessing to you both. I got home without any farther incident, but have not yet recovered fully the former Strength of my Arm. Your Brother Josiah Davenport is still at Pittsburgh, near 400 Miles west of this Place, where he has the Care of the Provincial Store, that was establish'd there during the Peace, for the Indian Trade; and since the War broke out again, there has been no good opertunity of bringing off the Goods, so he is oblig'd to remain with them. His wife and children are here; she seems to be in a bad State of Health, but the Children are well. My wife and Daughter thank you for your good wishes, and return theirs for you & yours.--Present my best Respects to Mr & Mrs Lowell, and my Love to your Wife and Children. Remember me too, to your Brother Davenport & his Family.

"Your affectionate Uncle

B Franklin"

-289-

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