The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

to Put a man to Death for Any crime I fear we should have a much worse Socity, tho we should Adopt His Scheme of a Prison built in a horrable Place, with Groaning Hinges, & Melancholy keepers, in such a Confinement would there be no Proliblity of its groing fimilier & Indiferent to them, & I do not concive of there being such an Entertaining Tale as to Impress the minds of children so as to have any Lasting Effectt. or that won of Thousand would be Reformed by it) it has been said Dr Franklin was the Auther of the Pamphlit but I think not.

I think I have not wrote you since I recived the Explanation of the medal I thank you for it, I should be much gratified with the Explaination of the other two. I sopose them to contain Encomiams on yr self but it is yr sister that asks it.

The Dreadfull clamity This Town has suffered by Fier has Included a Daughter of Tommy Hubards who married Mr Gouch, I think the worthyest of the Famely, they had there House burnt Down & lost aboundance of there cloathing & nesesaries her Uncle Tuttle is very Rich but Prehaps he thinks he may live to want all Him self I beleve He is not more than Seventy.

but some others has been charitiable notwithstanding the Dificulty of the Times, Aunt Patrage too is very Poor--in Sprit.

I will now tell you somthing that will Pleas you our worthy cousen Jonathan Williams has the Honourary Degree of master of Artes confered on him by the Corporation of our Colage, Dor Lathrop of of them tould me of it, you will see it after Comencement.

Remember my Love to yr Children & Grand children from yr Affectionat Sister JANE MECOM

per favour of
Col: Sargeant


"We can dine a Company of 24 Persons"

[First printed in Bigelow, Works, IX, 392-393, from a letter-press copy in the Library of Congress, and now more correctly printed from that

-294-

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