The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

ditions of return I may perhaps get them off at a higher price: The few that have sold went for 4/ this Curr(enc)y per Dozen."]

Philada. Feb. 22. 1789

DEAR SISTER

I received yours of Jan. 10. expressing the Difficulties you meet with in Disposing of the Childrens Books. It was not my Intention you should have any Trouble with them, as you will see by the enclos'd Copy of my Letter to Coz. Williams. By his sending them to you, it seems as if there was some Misunderstanding between you, or that he is tired of rendring you Services.--If you do not find some Bookseller who will buy them of you in the Lump, I think you had better pack them up, and send them back again. It is reported here, that they had like to have been sold to pay Freight and Charges, which if true, implies that Cousin Williams refus'd to meddle with them, and he has not answered my Letter, which confirms my Suspicion of there being some Miff. As they are not like to produce any thing for you, you may draw on me for forty Dollars, and your Bill shall be duly honour'd.--As to the Books themselves, how much soever your People may despise them, they are really valuable for the purpose of teaching Children to read. The largeness and plainness of the Character, and the little Sentences of common occurrence which they can understand when they read, make them delight in reading them, so as to forward their Progress exceedingly. Our little Richard not yet 5 Years old, has by their Means outstript his Brother Lewis in Reading, who is near nine. I am ever your loving Brother

B FRANKLIN

The Copy of my Letter to Cousin Williams may be a Curiosity to you, as it is not written but taken from the Original by a Press.


"Poor Laco"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 174-175; here printed from the manuscript in the American

-321-

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