The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

very sick but I am tould is Rather beter yester day. Since I wrot thus far Capt Ritch has calld & tould me he has a Barrill Flower on Board for me thank you Dear Brother you are allways mind- full of all Posable wants I my have & suply them before I can feel them.

Our good old friend Mrs Greene has been to see me to our Grat mortification she has some how mislade your Leter she thought she Brought it but finds her Self mistaken.

This Goes by Major Shaw marchant of the New Ship going to the East Indies He is a Border of Cousen williamss Remember my Love to Children & granchildren in which my Famely Joyns as in all Dutyfull Respect from yr Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

My Daughter Desiers to be Perticularly Remembred to you

[The bit of paper]

Whether the General Circumstances mentioned in the History of Baron Trenck are Founded on Fact


"I think my self very Lucky"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society.]

Boston Novr 25--1789

DEAR BROTHER

I think my self very Lucky that you happened to Light on my Nibour to send the Flower by for tho you have been Equaly good at all times in sending it we have all ways found it very dificult to find it when it came. this is a courtious obliging man is a Near Nebour came & tould me he had it on Board & sent it up to me without any troble,

-334-

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