The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

indolent, the task is too arduous. If you can find out what I mean, you must accept it as it is; if not, let me know, and I will get my daughter to write for me.

I have not seen Mr Hubbard; but, when he brought down the letters, we were sitting down to dinner; he came in, but he would not dine with us, as he was engaged. I invited him and expected he would come often, but he has not: I begin to fear he will not call for my letters.

I ought to have let Mr Bache know by cousin John Will I had received the bills, but was unwell and could write no more then. I hope you see Jonathan and his family, as they greatly loved your dear Father. Pray, remember me to them, and if there are any others to whom it will be acceptable from your affectionate aunt

JANE MECOM

Mrs Sarah Bache


Jane Mecom to Sarah Bache

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Benjamin Franklin Bache had begun the publication of his General Advertiser on October 1 of that year. The name was changed to Aurora General Idvertiser on November 8, 1794. Jane Mecom's reference to the "mis youse of a Tempting Aple" remains a tantalizing mystery. The "cousen williams" (not to be confused with "cousen John Williams") who "was going to see His children" was Jonathan Williams Sr. His son Jonathan with his wife had settled in Philadelphia, where he began a successful career as jurist and scientist and, on the appointment of Thomas Jefferson in 1801, first superintendent of West Point. There is a copy of this letter in the Yale University Library.]

My DEAR, MRS BACHE Boston Decr 2d--1790

I have wrot twice to you & wonce to Mr Bache besides the Short Line I sent by John Williams & have never Heard whether you Recved them it is Trew they were of Litle consequence to any won but my self but that I am not willing to forego the Last was by cousen williams who was going to see His children which I thought so fine an opertunity I wrot a

-343-

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