The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Franklin in his will had left fifty pounds to be equally divided "among the children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren of my sister, Jane Mecom, that may be living at the time of my decease." In this letter Jane Mecom named five in New England and one in Perth Amboy or South Amboy, New Jersey. The remaining ten were presumably children or grandchildren of Benjamin Mecom living in Philadelphia.]

Boston August 6 1791

HONRD GENTLEMEN

I feel myself guilty of a very disrespectfull Neglect in not writing to the Gentlemen The Excecutors of my dear, Venerable, Brothers Will for so long a time.

Gentlemen whom I know he had an Affection for, and whom he confided in to comply with His desires in disposeing the Effects his Benevolence had bestowed in his Will.

The only Apology I can make is a consciousness of the insufficency of my capacity to address you in a proper manner, and my Kinsman Bache very affectionately offer'd me every Service he could do me, and I accepted his kind offer, (flattering my-Self it would allso be some easement to you) to the the Neglect of my duty and good Manners.

I ought infallible to have consulted you Gentlemen on my Signing the Transfer from one Bank to another I am not other ways Apprehensive I have done Amiss but Shall be Strengthen"d by your approbation if your Honours Should favor me with it, and continue to receive my Legacy through his Hands if most agreeable to you.

The July payment 1791 is now due.

There is another Small Article that falls to my Posterity which I now take the Liberty to apply to you for, tho: my Daughter Seems to be the properst person to receive it.

It is the Legacy of Fifty pound sterling to be devided between the whole number, which were sixteen, liveing at my dear Brothers Death. If it could be done without difficulty, or Impropreity, I Should desire only such a part as belongs to my daughter Jane Collas, my Grand Daughter Jane Mecom, My Grandson Josiah Flagg of Iancister, and two great Grand Childran Sarah and Fmnk[lin] Greene, liveing at Road Island, from

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