Benedetto Croce's Poetry and Literature: An Introduction to Its Criticism and History

By Benedetto Croce; Giovanni Gullace | Go to book overview
Contents
Benedetto Croce frontispiece
Translator's Prefacexvii
Translator's Acknowledgmentsxi
Translator's Introductionxiii
Foreword3
I. Poetry and Literature5
1. Emotional or Immediate Expression6
2. Poetic Expression15
3. Prose Expression22
4. Oratorical Expression28
5. The Circularity of the Spirit36
6. Literary Expression40
7. The Domains of Literature48
8. "Art for Art's Sake " 62
9. "Pure Poetry " 69
10. Poetry, Nonpoetry, Antipoetry77
II. The Life of Poetry84
1. The Re-Evocation of Poetry, the Means of Interpretation84
2. Skeptical Objections to the Possibility of Re- Evocation89
3. The Historical-Esthetical Interpretation94
4. The Hatred for the Ugly, the Indulgence toward Imperfections, and the Indifference for the Structural Elements102
5. The Intranslatability of Poetic Re- Evocation114
III. Criticism and History of Poetry119
1. The Judgment of Poetry As a Synthesis of Sensibility and Thought119
2. Beauty, the Sole Category of Esthetic Judgment131
3. The Characterization of Poetry and the Completion of the Hermeneutical-Critical Process138
4. Esthetic Judgment As the History of Poetry146
5. False History of Poetry150
6. The History of Poetry and the Personality of the Poet161
7. The Empirical Poetics 170
VI. The Formation of the Poet and the Precepts175
1. Spontaneity and Discipline175
2. The Precepts182
3. The Stiffening of Literary Genres and Their Disintegration187
4. Poetry and the Other Arts195
Bibliography203
Index207

-v-

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