White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina

By Warren B. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER. II
White Servants Meet the Labor Demand

THE SECOND AND REALLY PRINCIPAL, reason for the importation of white servants is to be found in the demands of the labor market. The list of servants from Barbados is typical of any such group arriving in the early days. There were two sawyers, one carpenter, one tailor, two planters, one woman servant, and three without special designations.1 Such a distribution of skills might well have been the best possible selection to meet the needs of an infant colony.

As already noted, even Virginia, a colony of many years standing, had not in 1670 become convinced of the superiority of Negroes as field hands. Both white servants and Negro slaves were brought into the colony from the beginning. Later, when rice began to dominate as the great staple crop, the question was settled in favor of the cheaper and hardier labor. But rice did not monopolize the attention of the planters until the 1730's. Even after this period there was an opportunity for white field labor in the development. of indigo, which was introduced in the 1740's. "Patricola" in 1747 actually urged greater interest in the planting of indigo for this very reason. This crop, "Patricola" wrote, "can bear the Charge of a long Land-Carriage as well as Deer skins, and may be carried on with a great deal of Ease by white People only, without Blacks, which Rice cannot be, [therefore] it could not but invite Numbers of new Settlers amongst us, and greatly tend to the peopling and strengthening our Western Frontiers"2 . . . . It was only on the eve of the Revolution, during the last great colonial period of prosperity ( 1770-1773), that the economy matured and the need for field labor was met entirely, at least on the coast, by Negroes. It took one hundred years for such specialization to develop. (See Appendix III.) Meanwhile white indentured servants were continuously in demand although always in declining numbers.

As the colony developed there came about a division of labor, with the Negro slaves doing the field work and the white indentured

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 156

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.