White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina

By Warren B. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
Sources of Supply

AFTER CONSIDERATION OF THE VARIOUS REASONS for introducing white servants, attention should next be given to the sources from which they were drawn. Disbanded soldiers, defeated rebels, orphans, convicts, destitute Irish, and poor Protestants made up the more important contributing groups. In 1697 the Council of Trade and Plantations was concerned whether the King would "be pleased to be at the charge of transporting any disbanded soldiers" to the colonies. The end of the war in Europe should have provided an opportunity at this time for new servants. If the King were not interested, "it remains only that those who are willing to be transported as servants for a certain number of years apply to the merchants dealing with the said Plantations, and make their own terms with them beforehand."1 If none came out after the Peace of Ryswick, the government undertook a great experiment in Nova Scotia after the 1748 peace.

If victorious English soldiers were not available, defeated English and Scottish rebels were. There was generally a plentiful supply to be found among the adherents of the lost cause in the civil strifes of the mother-country.2 During the assizes held by the notorious Judge Jeffreys after the failure of Monmouth's Rebellion, wholesale deportation became the order of the day. Under date of September and October 1685 appear numerous lists of rebels to be transported from Dorchester, Taunton, Wells, and Exeter?3 Parliament passed a law arranging for transportation which required the colonies to pass laws for receiving them. On January 8, 1687, Lieutenant Governor Stede of Barbados wrote the Lords of Trade and Plantations: "We have already passed the Act required respecting transported rebels, which I hope will meet with approval. The first ship-load of them has arrived, and I send an account of the people to whom they have been assigned. A second shipload does not agree with the list sent to me."4 After the Revolution of 1688 the King "ordered the

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 156

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.