White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina

By Warren B. Smith | Go to book overview

INDEX
NOTE: Names listed in the tables and Appendix IV are not indexed. Spelling of proper names, with few exceptions, conforms to that in the various sources noted, which may differ from the usual rendering, i. e. Gourdes for Gourdin.
Aalder, Richard, 86
Acadians, 36-37
Acts and other measures (relating to white servants), 1661, "An ACt for the good governing of Servants ( Barbados)," 4; 1686, "An Act inhibiting the trading with servants or slaves" (including penalties for absconding servants), 74; April 9, 1687 (provision for servants arriving without indentures), 72; 1691, servant freed if punishment too severe, 80; 1696, "An Act for the Encouragement of the Importation of White Servants," 19; Nov. 3, 1698 (for promoting importation of servants), 19; June 7, 1712 (to foster importation of servants), 28; 1712, fine for importing criminals, 39; 1712 (punishment for petty larceny, 78; June 30, 1716, "An Act for the better Setling and Regulating the Militia" (military service for servants), 32; June 30, 1716, "An Act for the Encouragement of the Importation of White Servants," 19; May 2, 1716. servant killed, 33-34; Aug. 4, 1716 (to pay for 32 white servants purchased by the governor), 29; 1717, "An Act for the Better Governing and Regulating White Servants" (See Appendix I); 1717 (provision for servants under 16 years old arriving without indentures) punishment of runaway servants and of those who trade with or harbor runU+00D aways), 72, 74, 77, 79; 1717 (every plantation with 10 working hands must have one white servant), 31; June 1722 (tax on Negroes to enU+00D courage importation of white servants), 31; April 1725 (penalty for not importing white servants), 31; 1726 (proportioning white servants to slaves), 31; 1727, (proportioning white servants to slaves), 31; 1727, stealing of pettiaugers and slaves by servants, a felony; runaway servants (procedure with runaway servants), 76; 1732, duties on slaves to be used for settlement of poor protestants, 53; 1739 (proportioning of white servants to slaves), 31; May 1740, regulation of patrols, 32; Dec. 1741, patrols, 33; 1741, to prevent importation of criminals, 40; 1744 (penalties for running away and provision for certificates of release, penalties for masters' severity), 75- 76, 81; 1745, patrols, 33; 1746 (provision that masters of all overseers and white servants obliged to do patrol duty must furnish overseers and servants with a horse and furniture), 33; June 14, 1751, funds for white settlers (poor protestants), 63; 1752, measures to induce further settlements of poor protestants, 59; July 25, 1761, additional funds for poor protestants, 65.
Agnen, Alexander and wife, 22
Akerman, Albert (also wife and child --no first names given), 69
Alexander, Rich, 4
Allen, Andrew, 28

-145-

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