Political Ideologies: A Comparative Approach

By Mostafa Rejai | Go to book overview

road nationalists). Only through hard work can the masses be mobilized. Only through mobilization can a revolutionary movement gain momentum.

In theory, the social base of Leninism is internationalist. In practice, however, Lenin turned Marxism into a national phenomenon resting primarily on the working class and secondarily on the peasantry, with leadership always coming from the middle-class intellectuals, who form the core of the Communist party. At some unspecified moment in the future, however, Lenin expected communism to become an international reality.


Selected Bibliography

Bunyon, James, and H. H. Fisher. The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917-1918. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1934.

Carr, Edward Hallett. The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917-1923. Vol. 1, New York: Macmillan, 1951.

Chamberlin, William Henry. The Russian Revolution, 1917-1921. 2 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1935.

Conquest, Robert. V. I. Lenin. New York: Viking, 1972.

Deutscher, Isaac. Lenin's Childhood. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.

Fischer, Louis. The Life of Lenin. New York: Harper & Row, 1964.

Hill, Christopher. Lenin and the Russian Revolution. New York: Macmillan, 1950.

Lenin, V. I. Collected Works or Selected Works. Various editions.

Meyer, Alfred G. Leninism. New York: Praeger, 1962.

Payne, Robert. The Life and Death of Lenin. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1964.

Shub, David. Lenin. New York: Doubleday, 1948.

Theen, Rolf H. W. Lenin: Genesis and Development of a Revolutionary. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1973.

Trotsky, Leon. The History of the Russian Revolution. 1 vol. ed. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1936.

-----. Lenin: Notes for a Biographer. New York: Putnam, 1971.

-----. The Young Lenin. New York: Doubleday, 1972.

Ulam, Adam B. The Bolsheviks: The Intellectual and Political History of the Triumph of Communism in Russia. New York: Macmillan, 1965.

Wilson, Edmund. To the Finland Station. New York: Doubleday, 1940.

Wolfe, Bertram D. Three Who Made a Revolution. Rev. ed. New York: Dial Press, 1964.

Wolfenstein, E. Victor. The Revolutionary Personality: Lenin, Trotsky, Gandhi. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1967.

-114-

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Political Ideologies: A Comparative Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Part I Comparative Framework 1
  • 1: Comparative Analysis of Political Ideologies 18
  • Part II Selected Ideologies 21
  • 2: Nationalism 55
  • 4: Marxism 97
  • 5: Leninism 114
  • 6: Guerrilla Communism 115
  • 7: Democracy 169
  • Part III Recapitulation 173
  • 8: Comparing Political Ideologies 175
  • Appendixes 181
  • Selected Bibliography 193
  • Index 195
  • About the Author 202
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