China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

A. Pronouncements by Members of the CCP Leadership

One searches in vain for an extended, systematic, and credible explanation by Mao Zedong himself of the goals of the Cultural Revolution. There is no master script to be found, no blueprint, no scenario, no game plan. All there is are random, scattered remarks--some spontaneous, others carefully hedged; some just possibly meant to be taken at face value, others almost certainly intended to obscure rather than elucidate. "Let us toast to the unfolding of a nationwide all-round civil war!" is what at least two guests remember hearing Mao propose on his seventy-third birthday, on 26 December 1966.1 Was that what the Chinese Communist Party Chairman had in mind? Or was his intention (as he was quoted as saying in the People's Daily a week later) to achieve "the greatest ever revolutionary transformation of society, unprecedented in the history of mankind"?2 Were the two goals possibly one and the same? Or one the means, the other the end? We have no firm answers.

The three texts in this section are from the autumn of 1966, a time when the buzz verbs of the Cultural Revolution were "down with," "drag out," "smash, burn, fry, and scorch," and the all-purpose "kill"; and the labels affixed to the movement's victims such creative dysphemisms as "ox-freaks and snake-monsters" and long and ugly "scientific" (so the Party Center insisted) designations like "the biggest handful of Party-persons in power taking the capitalist road." Helping Mao to keep the Cultural Revolution on course were his recently promoted deputy and "closest comrade-in-arms," Lin Biao, and the members of an ad hoc Central Cultural Revolution Group--a dozen or so

____________________
1
Chen Boda, cited in Ye Yonglie, Mingren fengyun lu (Famous Men of the Hour) ( Guilin: Lijiang chubanshe, 1992), p. 14; and Guan Feng, cited in Ye Yonglie caifang shouji (Ye Yonglie's Interview Notes) ( Shanghai: Shanghai shehui kexueyuan chubanshe, 1993), p. 119.
2
Renmin ribao, 1 January 1967.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.