China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

9
Public Notice Banning Nationwide Organizations
CCP Center and State Council

Source: This public notice was issued on 12 February 1967 in the form of Central Document Zhongfa [ 1967] 47. Our translation is based on the text reproduced in CCP Central Committee General Office and General State Council Office Joint Cultural Revolution Reception Office , ed., Wuchanjieji wenhua dageming youguan wenjian huyi ( Collection of Documents Concerning the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution), 5 vols. ( Beijing, 1967-68), Vol. 1, pp. 154-56.

In this Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, a number of so-called nationwide organizations have appeared in Beijing and elsewhere. None of them have come about through great alliances based on nationwide democratic elections of genuine revolutionaries, from lower levels to higher levels. Instead, they have been formed by small numbers of people banding together temporarily. A tiny number of these organizations have been set up by landlord, rich-peasant, counter-revolutionary, hooligan, and Rightist elements. The CCP Center and the State Council have therefore decided as follows:
1. 1. The Center does not recognize any so-called nationwide organizations. All such organizations should disband immediately. Their members should immediately return from Beijing, or elsewhere, to where they came from and take part in the movement in their own units.
2. 2. The public funds that these organizations have obtained under various pretexts should be demanded back in full by the units that approved the initial payment. An account, to be audited by the unit that approved payment, must be made of the money spent prior to the receipt of this notice. Articles purchased must be retrieved, except those consumed. Money drawn after the receipt of this notice may not be spent. Anybody absconding with money is to be prosecuted and punished according to law.
3. 3. If it turns out that any of these organizations have been engaged in counter-revolutionary activities, their members must inform the public security organs, which in turn will be responsible for investigating and handling the matter.

The above has hereby been announced.

-54-

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