China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

from all signboards. Already doctors who carried on private practices have closed their offices. As for the problem of "high salaries and interest payments," the issue is to be decided by the government.


24
As I Watched Zhou Tianxing and Lu Wen Sweep the Floor

Liu Tianzhang

Source: Our translation of this big-character poster ("Guan Zhou Tianxing, Lu Wensaodi yougan") written by a Red Guard at the Beijing Aeronautical Institute, has been made from the booklet entitled Hongweibing de hao banvang--Liu Tianzhang (A Fine Red Guard Example--Liu Tianzhang) ( Beijing, 1967), p. 107, published by the Beijing Aeronautical Institute Revolutionary Committee and Red Flag Combat Team Political Department. In 1966, Zhou Tianxing was a deputy secretary of the Aeronautical Institute Party Committee, and Lu Wen was Zhou's wife.

I was delighted to see that ox-monster and snake-demon couple Zhou and Lu shorn of their old prestige, laboring under our surveillance. Such is the might of the proletarian dictatorship, the might of the popular masses.

Chairman Mao says: "I came to feel that compared with the workers and peasants the unremolded intellectuals were not clean and that, in the last analysis, the workers and peasants were the cleanest people, and, even though their hands were soiled and their feet smeared with cow-dung, they were really cleaner than the bourgeois and petty bourgeois intellectuals." Every month, the black gang elements Zhou "the Dog" Tianxing and Lu Wen take 300 to 500 yuan of the working people's money, and yet all they do is oppose the Party, oppose the people, and oppose Mao Zedong Thought. Everything they eat and wear comes from the people, but all they do is try to waylay and entrap the sons and daughters of the poor and lower-middle peasants, the workers, and the revolutionary cadres. They are a pair of vampires, neatly dressed and smelling of perfume all over, but with souls putrid and rotten to the core. If you threw them in the latrine, you'd end up

-146-

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