China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

Class Viewpoints in Everyday Work

We used to think that the reason some people had different ways of thinking was because they were intelligent and good-tempered. If we make a careful analysis, we find that a person's consciousness or thoughts have nothing to do with his temperament. People of the same class are all the same, no matter if they're impatient or not.

People with different family backgrounds have their thoughts branded differently according to class. The fact that many members of society are unable to live a harmonious family life may seem to be due to a problem with their disposition. In fact, it is just like with Li Shuangshuang and Sun Xiwang--a battle between two kinds of thought.2


40
Reforming the Fine Arts

Jiang Qing

Source: This transcript ("Tan meishu gaige") of a tape-recorded meeting of Jiang Qing, Yao Wenyuan, and Chen Boda with members of the Zhejiang Provincial Revolutionary Committee on 19 May 1968 is included in Jiang Qing tongzhi lun wenhua yishu (Comrade Jiang Qing on Culture and the Fine Arts), published by students in the Chinese Language Department of Hangzhou University in July 1968 (pp. 69-73). Our translation is slightly abridged.

I don't like Pan Tianshou's paintings. They are so gloomy. Those bald eagles he paints are really ugly. Gloomy and hideous. ( Wenyuan: The fact that they are so gloomy has to do with him being a special agent. Those bald eagles Pan Tianshou likes to paint are embodiments of special agents.)

A few years ago, how come there were so many paintings by Pan Tianshou around? Why did you here in Hangzhou praise him so much? I remember there was even an exhibit of his in Beijing, and the prices

____________________
2
Li and Sun are the central characters in the popular novel Li Shuangshuang, in which Li represents the progressive and Sun the conservative "kind of thought."

-197-

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