China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

43
Vigorously and Speedily Eradicate Bizarre Bourgeois Hair Styles
Revolutionary Workers of the Hairdressing Trade in GuangzhouSource: Survey of China Mainland Press, No. 3776, 8 September 1966. Originally published in Yangcheng wanbao ( Yangcheng Evening News), 27 August 1966.Holding high the great red banner of Mao Zedong Thought and displaying vigorous revolutionary spirit, young revolutionary fighters in Guangzhou have been busy putting up revolutionary big-character posters in the streets to attack the old ideas, culture, customs, and habits of all exploiting classes, in a determined effort to build Guangzhou into a city extraordinarily proletarian and extraordinarily revolutionary in character.This revolutionary rebel spirit displayed by these young fighters is indeed splendid, for it has greatly boosted the morale of revolutionary people and provided us with profound inspiration and enlightenment. We want to learn from these young fighters and their revolutionary rebel spirit by launching a proletarian revolutionary rebellion in the hairdressing trade of the city. The following proposals are put forward by us before all revolutionary workers of the hairdressing trade in Guangzhou:
All revolutionary workers of the hairdressing trade should ardently and resolutely support the revolutionary actions of the young revolutionary fighters and the revolutionary masses. We should warmly welcome their criticisms and ardently support big-character posters that speak out against us. We should provide the young revolutionary fighters and the revolutionary masses beforehand with necessary facilities such as tables, benches, brush pens, ink, paper, and paste so they can write big-character posters and paste them up on the walls.
All revolutionary workers of the hairdressing trade should promptly take action and make revolution alongside the young revolutionary fighters and the revolutionary masses in a highly militant spirit.

-210-

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