China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview
for training primary school teachers must absorb the sons and daughters of the "five red elements" into their schools.
Those who have names with feudal bourgeois overtones will voluntarily go to police stations to change their names.
No fences or small houses are allowed to be built inside or outside a garden. The growth of such selfish thoughts must not be encouraged.
Abolish the system of the sale of annual tickets for parks. If the workers, peasants, and soldiers need to rest, all tickets will be distributed to them by factories and agencies.
We suggest that the state consider a universal increase in wages of the workers and a decrease in wages for the authorities of the bourgeoisie.
"Black Gang" elements shall be fined according to their criminal acts.
Advocate simplified characters. From now on, all newspapers and other publications will use simplified characters in their headlines.

The Maoism School (originally No. 26 Middle School) Red Guards [ August 1966]


45 "Revolutionize the Spring Festival"

Shanghai Workers Revolutionary Rebel General Headquarters et al.

Source: The source for the text of this proposal is a collection compiled and printed in the 1980s by the Committee for the Historical Documentation of the Shanghai Labor Movement. We have deleted from our translation the names of the thirty-four cosignatory organizations.


Chairman Mao's Teachings:

"We are not merely good at destroying an old world, but will also be good at building a new world."

"Practice frugality while making revolution."

-222-

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