China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

49
On How to Handle Foreign Currency, Foreign Currency Receipts, and Foreign Currency Securities Confiscated by Red Guards

State Council and People's Bank of China

Source: State Council Document Guofawen [ 1968] 23, dated 17 January 1968, entitled "Guowuyuan pizhuan 'Zhongguo renmin yinhang guanyu hongweibing chachao de waibi, waibi piaoju he waibi youjia zhengjian chuli wenti de baogao'." Our translation is of the full text as reprinted on 2 March 1968 in No. 58 of Dou Pi Gai (Struggle Criticize Transform), a daily bulletin edited by the Revolutionary Committee of the Beijing Institute of Politics and Law.

To all provincial, municipal, and autonomous regional Revolutionary Committees (including preparatory groups) and Military Control Commissions; all military regions and districts:

We are now distributing to you a report from the People's Bank of China entitled "On How to Handle Foreign Currency, Foreign Currency Receipts, and Foreign Currency Securities Confiscated by Red Guards." The State Council agrees with the proposals made by the People's Bank of China in this matter and hopes that you will study and implement the proposals.

[Original] appendix: Report from the People's Bank of China on How to Handle Foreign Currency, Foreign Currency Receipts, and Foreign Currency Securities Confiscated by Red Guards

To the State Council:

In the course of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, the little Red Guard generals and revolutionary organizations of the masses have confiscated no small amount of foreign currencies, foreign currency receipts, and foreign currency securities. Some have already been deposited in banks, while others remain in the possession of various work units. Given the absence of a clear policy and the fact that the [political] status of the persons [whose possessions have been]

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