China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

tion to add to their achievements, overcome shortcomings, and do an even better job of economizing, and to repay with new and outstanding achievements our great leader Chairman Mao's profound concern.

In the army, signs of waste are still quite widespread and in some cases quite serious. In view of this, we must definitely strive to do a good job of adding to our achievements and overcoming shortcomings and errors.

From now on, we must hold the great red banner of Mao Zedong Thought even higher, give prominence to proletarian politics, and execute our professional tasks well. We must excel in being economical and strive, in everything we do, to be diligent and conscientious, hard working and thrifty, and industrious and ingenious.

The General Logistics Department of the
Chinese People's Liberation Army
3 January 1969


53
Concerning the Speed of Economic Development during the Ten Years of Domestic Turmoil

State Statistical Bureau

Source: This is a translation of "Dui shinian neiluan shiqi jingji fazhan sudu de yixie fenxi," a document produced "for reference purposes" by the State Statistical Bureau and published in CCP Central Secretariat Research Office Economy Group, ed., Jingfi wenti vanjiu ziliao (Research Materials on Economic Problem) ( 1983- 1984) ( Beijing: Zhongguo caizheng jingji chubanshe, 1986), pp. 217-20.

Untold damage was done to the national economy during the ten years of domestic turmoil, and yet the speed of development remained fairly high. How is this possible? Do the statistics reflect what actually happened? Our tentative analysis of this problem is as follows:


1. The development of industry and agriculture during this period was actually not very rapid.

During the ten-year period from 1967 to 1976, the gross output value of industry and agriculture grew by an annual average of 7.1 percent,

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