China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

63
Regulations Governing the Publication of Books about the "Great Cultural Revolution"

CCP Central Propaganda Department and State Press and Publications Administration

Source: This is a translation of "Guanyu chuban 'wenhua dageming' tushu wenti de ruogan guiding" reprinted in PRC State Press and Publications Administration Policy Laws and Regulations Section, ed., Zhonghua renmin gongheguo xianxing xinwen chuban fagui huibian (1949-1990) ( Operative Press and Publishing Laws and Regulations of the People's Republic of China, 1949- 1990) ( Beijing: Renmin chubanshe, 1991), pp. 231-32.

Recently, some publishing houses have published a number of books specifically researching and presenting the history, people, and events of the "Cultural Revolution"; other publishing houses are in the midst of planning the publication of books of this kind; and some publishing houses have, for the sole purpose of making a profit, already put out so-called Cultural Revolutionary "anecdotes," "secrets," and "behind- the-scenes accounts" to attract a readership. This has had a negative impact in society. Most recently, a leading comrade with the Center pointed out with respect to the publication of books dealing with the "Cultural Revolution" that in view of the Center's consistent spirit of uniting as one, looking forward, and dealing with historical matters in a sweeping rather than in a finicky way; and in view of comrade Deng Xiaoping's instructions about the need at present to strengthen the Party's concentrated and unified leadership and to make full use of its dominant political position, there is really no need to consider the publication of a Dictionary of the Cultural Revolution, since a work of that kind in all likelihood would be controversial and lead to the reopening of old controversies. To disregard the Notification [in this matter] issued earlier by the Central Propaganda Department, to present the department with a fait accompli, and in this way force the Center to give permission to publish, is unacceptable.1 [We] reaffirm the regulations laid down by the Center in the past and stress

____________________
1
We have not been able to locate a copy of the Central Propaganda Department notification referred to here.

-310-

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