China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

clear as an azure sky and a peaceful setting.

If you do not possess the power to exist, confinement will destroy you. Let the moral consolation come later.

However, I must admit the crime forced on me in order to become a free human being.


72
Letter to Chen Yun, Deng Xiaoping, and Hu Yaobang

Wang Li

Source: Wang Li, Lishi jiang xuangao wo wuzui (History Will Pronounce Me Innocent) (N.p., 20 November 1993), p. 38. This source is a privately printed collection of letters and documents concerning Wang Li's expulsion from the CCP. I wish to thank the author for sharing it with us.

Comrades Chen Yuri, Xiaoping, and Yaobang:

Having pondered the matter for an entire week, I respectfully ask the Party Center to reconsider its disciplinary action against me.

I have grown to maturity through the Party's nurturing since the age of fourteen. The Party's profound loving kindness to me over the past fifty years remains forever engraved in my mind. I cannot even begin to describe the pain that I feel now as I am being asked to leave the Party. I did commit serious errors and remain in debt to the Party, yet proceeding from the Party's standpoint, I remain hopeful that you will give me a chance to remain a member and to continue my transformation.

Among the key members of the Central Cultural Revolution Group, from the outset I was regarded as a "holdover,"' and I was also the only person to be excluded from the Case Examination Group that persecuted older cadres. From a policy point of view, the Party would be justified in taking this distinction into account when deciding on how I am to be dealt with.

As far as I am concerned, I remain committed to clearing up thoroughly the theoretical chaos--particular the theses of the so-called "continuing revolution under the dictatorship of the proletariat" and the

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