English and American Philosophy since 1800: A Critical Survey

By Arthur K. Rogers | Go to book overview

ENGLISH AND AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY SINCE 1800

CHAPTER I

SCOTTISH REALISM

§ 1. Reid. Thomas Brown
1. 1. The close of the eighteenth century in England was one of those recurrent periods when speculative curiosity about the bases of human existence and human belief seems almost to have vanished from the mind. It is only in the field of political philosophy that genuine creative activity is visible; here indeed three names lend to the period real distinction. In William Godwin, a thin but acute intelligence, we find a sincere passion for liberty and equal justice that is still not unimpressive, though it is turned into the somewhat shallow channels of a rationalistic and individualistic logic which renders it an easy prey to the scornful. Quite at the opposite extreme from Godwin stands the powerful and florid personality of Burke, who was uttering noble truisms to prove that liberty is an overrated blessing, and that reforms are only justified when they involve no element of risk to men of property and breeding. Meanwhile Jeremy Bentham, engaged in trying to get an English ministry interested in the good work of reforming law and building model prisons, was already beginning to suspect that something besides ignorance and inattention lies back of that lack of passionate regard for the greatest good of

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English and American Philosophy since 1800: A Critical Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Contents xi
  • ENGLISH AND AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY SINCE 1800 1
  • Chapter II - THE UTILITARIANS 49
  • Chapter III Authority and Reason in Theology 96
  • Chapter IV - NATURALISM AND EVOLUTION 128
  • Chapter V - ABSOLUTE IDEALISM 207
  • Chapter VI - PERSONAL IDEALISM, PANPSYCHISM AND REALISM 315
  • Chapter VII 359
  • Chapter VIII - NEO-REALISM 411
  • INDEX TO AUTHORS 453
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