Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities

By George A. Graham | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A ANALYSIS OF STATEMENTS BY MEN IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE ON UNIVERSITY TRAINING FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

TO SUPPLEMENT INTERVIEWS with public officials, students, and faculty members, questionnaires were sent to men in the public service who had received university training in the institutions studied. Social science teaching departments, chiefly economics, political science, and sociology, furnished the names and addresses of graduates believed to be in the public service at the time. In only a few institutions was there a record of any sort; hence the list compiled is incomplete. Fifty questionnaires were first sent out June 1, 1938, to discover whether replies would be sufficiently numerous to make a more extended inquiry worth while, and nearly four hundred additional questionnaires were sent out June 17. The answers were tabulated in September, 1939, at which time 210 replies had been received. Sixteen additional questionnaires were returned because of inadequate addresses, indicating that the number who actually received questionnaires did not exceed 430. Eleven of the 210 persons replying, however, had left the public service, leaving 199 persons who were in the public service at the time.

The questionnaires were intended to elicit discussion and subjective comment as well as to draw out information on specific points; fully as much attention was given to such remarks in interpreting questionnaires as to the more matter-of-fact answers. The replies to many questions, however, fell into rather definite categories, and such replies were tabulated. No figures are presented for replies that could not be classified satisfactorily.

In classifying replies to a question about the type of careers in which the subject was engaged, the classification suggested by Lewis B. Sims in University Training for the Public Service (Civil Service Assembly, Pamphlet No. 12, April 1938, pp. 26-27) was followed with certain exceptions. Among the exceptions were these: clerical work was assigned not to the managerial class but to "other types of work"; police work was

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